Honda Odyssey problem areas

Honda Odyssey problem areas

Honda Odyssey problem areas 

ImageImage One of the most popular Honda converters that rebuilders are encountering is the Dacco H-21, which is found in the ‘99 and newer Honda Odyssey with a 3.5L engine and some ‘99 and newer Acura. Although this converter seems to be simple to fix, it has its share of problems.

First, special attention must be given to the sprag assembly. On numerous occasions, the inner sprag race has had a tendency to seize itself to the stator caps. During disassembly the inner sprag race must be polished with a #600 grit emery cloth to provide a mirror-like finish.

Second, the stator caps must be refinished allowing an additional .001” clearance. During operation, this converter operates at an extreme temperature which causes it to seize. The additional clearance helps provides more area for lubrication of the sprag. The stator cap and sprag race must turn freely with no resistance before assembly. Heat causes expansion of the two different metals and by reducing interference the metals stay cooler and cause less friction. Failure occurs not only because of excessi ve heat but also because of inadequate ATF. It is suggested to use of a higher quality synthetic ATF during installation. If this is not possible, the use of an aftermarket ATF additive designed for Honda is suggested.

Third, the impeller hub is often damaged or cracked on the pump drive area. Careful visual inspection is required. There should also be delicate transportation and handling of this core because replacement hubs are not available at this time. With careful inspection and assembly, these three problems are preventable and will ensure a quality rebuild if taken into consideration when measuring clearance and ATF flow. As a last suggestion always check the damper spring retainers on this unit. Most of the time they are cracked. Careful examination is required and preventive reinforcement by tack welding is suggested. Dennis Sneath Midwest Converters

– Found in September 2007 Newsletter