Flashback from New York, part Two

Flashback from New York, paImageImage

Notice the machining accomplished using a .060 grooving tool.

Notice the machining accomplished using a .060 grooving tool.

rt Two: ZFHP5

Using the grooving tool, plunge approx. .080 deep to accomplish separation.

Using the grooving tool, plunge approx. .080 deep to accomplish separation.

As promised in September’s issue, we are con tinuing to report on the proper disassembly of the ZFHP5 torque converter. Mark Mustard, of Branting Industries, has provided the TRCA newsletter with excellent photos displaying the proper tooling and technique used to machine the captive clutch for disassembly.

Using a grooving or parting tool with a .060- .090 wide insert, plunge directly into the surface of the retainer creating close to a 2.950 diameter groove. Slowly, feel your way approximately .080- .100 deep or until separation has occurred. (see Photo)

Mustard assures members this procedure is simpler than it may appear. After cutting a few of these retainers, the rebuilding of these converters should become quite routine.

In the photos, the clean and accurate separation is quite visible. No further machining is necessary. Thank you to Mark M u s t a r d and Joe Rivera for their extensive research required to educate members about this procedure.

Now, this converter can be easily cleaned and new O-rings and clutch disks can be installed before welding the retainer together. Using a simple pair of welder’s vice grips or making your own assembly tool, you may lightly compress the retainer to its original height before tack welding four to five spots for temporary alignment. At this time, the clutch release may be simulated with the use of an air nozzle inserted into the oil release hole.

If you are satisfied with the proper clutch release and apply, you may permanently weld the retainer entirely, which will ensure integrity. Let it be noted some rebuilders feel only a few tack welds are necessary to prevent damaging the O-ring beneath the retainer. If you choose to use either method, be sure to weld in small steps to avoid overheating.

Found in issue October 2005